SOLYMAN WORIEDH

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ExhibitionPhoto1

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Curatorial Rationale

War and Perspective

Due to my Syrian heritage, I have witnessed first-hand the current civil-war, the impact and effect it has on the civilians. The most shocking experience I witnessed wasn’t the brutal destruction caused by air strikes and terror bombings, but the suffering and despair that resulted from that. Hundreds of thousands of people living with the constant struggle to simply provide food and clean water for their children is heart breaking to me.

 

I believe, there is always a light shining in every dark place. During the completion of my CAS project, I began to perceive Syria from a whole new perspective. Even with all the hardship endured, there is beauty that flourishes through the Syrian peoples’ hearts. I experienced that through their never-ending noble hospitality. Even though they had very little to give, they humbly shared as if they had plenty. This reminded me of the privileges I grew up with; simple things like a warm meal, a secure house, and a whole family we take for granted every day, not realizing that all of it can disappear with just one explosion.

 

With my exhibition, I want to give an insight of the reality of war. It is not my aim to go into any political discussion, but to show the pure reality of what ferocious battle can result in. Whatever political interests are trying to be fulfilled, the reality of war is always the same. The innocent civilians will have to suffer, due to a reason they may never know, nor understand.

 

I was influenced by the artwork of the Japanese artist Kumi Yamashita, who works with light and shadow instillations. It complements my theme, with a specific correlation to my art work “Toy Soldier”, as one perspective changes when the light is turned on and off. You do not truly understand what the art work is until you switch the light on. It supports my theme, as most of the suffering in war is just overlooked, until one sees it in person.

 

 

The exhibition is set to view the “Toy Soldier” first, followed by “Shot to Life” second, as these two pieces are connected. Next, “Burned Freedom” should be viewed, where “Collapsed Beauty” will finish the exhibition off.

This path will take you through the different results of war, exploring death and the difficulty to express the soldiers individuality, as well as the struggles for survival.